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20121214
20121214
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the next couple of days or the very beginning of next week for us to have engineered our way to a solution. >> reporter: the fiscal cliff is really a negotiation between two men, and one of them today was not sounding very happy. house speaker john boehner brought out the charts to make his case. >> here we are at the eleventh hour, and the president still isn't serious about dealing with this issue right here. it's this issue-- spending. >> reporter: the president left his spokesman to respond that republicans were pushing a plan of fantasy economics that raised more revenues while also cutting taxes on the wealthy. >> what spending cuts have the republicans put forward? the proposal that we've seen is a two-page letter, and the much- discussed second proposal is less than half a page. there is no specificity behind what the republicans have put forward. >> reporter: right now, the risk is rising that we will avoid the fiscal cliff, but end up with what some call a worst case outcome. >> we get some sort of hoaky deal that's put together with gimmicks and baseline adjustments and all that
less. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: violence continued across syria today as the united states welcomed a russian admission that syria's rebels may succeed in overthrowing president bashar al-assad. syrian state television showed >> woodruff: for more on all of this we turn to vitaly churkin, russia's ambassador to the united nations. thank you for joining us. let me begin by asking you about the comment today made by your deputy foreign minister mr. bog don november. he said today "it is impossible to exclude a victory of the syrian opposition." how would you describe
young immigrants in the u.s. illegally and seeking a reprieve from deportation. >> my values and customs are now american. so, you know, the idea of getting kicked out to korea and never come back to the u.s., i just can't even imagine this >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> warner: and we examine the growing turmoil in egypt on the eve of a referendum vote on a new constitution. >> one of the major-- has been one between islimus and nonover the future of egypt and the character of the nation >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. t
they are moving too slowly, and could fragment. the police took us on patrol to see the violent side of an intractable political battle about the country's future. >> mostly teenagers. they are pushed by higher leaders. >> demonstrators opposed videos on youtube of what they do. the police said there was fun, using only -- police said they used force only to protect civilians. but we went to a protest about what they said were punitive and violent police raids. one of the demonstrators is still waiting to have dozens of shotgun pellets removed from what he said was the police attack and weeks ago. >> we want only freedom. we will come back and back and back. we want freedom. >> these people are shia muslims, the majority in bahrain. they are calling for the downfall of the king. like most of the ruling class, he is sunni muslim. the children reacted fastest when the police moved in. in the she of villages -- shia villages, demonstrations happened to him daily, even though they were banned. bahrain is caught up in big forces of work in the middle east. the pressure for change. the int
in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> the california endowment. health happens in neighborhoods. learn more. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: dr. linda bradley is the founder of a program aimed at women of color called celebrate sisterhood. i read a piece that you wrote: 10 ways to put your doctor at of business and i was fascinated by what i saw and i thought to ask you. whether or not doctors really want to be put up of business and you know where i am going. there is so much money that is made in the medical profession. i wonder not to cast a person -- aspersion on you but how serious are wary about getting to a point where people do not need hospitals, they do not need doctors. they do not need the kinds of medical insurance we have. can you imagine a time when we will get to a place where we will be so healthy that we can put doctors out of business? >> i am optimistic that we can do that. doctors would relish the opportunity to take care of patients, to be looking at preventive ways to promote health. if
. >> the interpreter: gation they are using extreme measures, you know, water boarding, and even within that scene without a lot of dialogue i found to be really compelling, to think of playing that, you know, as an actor and to start from there to see where, as the journey goes on she descends the rabbit hole and becomes a stranger to herself, this life that she knew, like a shadow. >> rose: she loses herself in her mission. >> yeah, until the very end when the pilot asks her where do you want to go there is this moment of not knowing where she can go or even who she is, and it is such a big question for maya at the end. >> rose: who is she? >> well, i don't think she knows who she is, you know, because -- >> rose: or where she goes from there. >> exactly, she lived her whole life with this one goal, what happens, and what means did she use to achieve that goal, and what does that make her now that is over? >> rose:. >> where do we go now? the movie ends with a question, and it is unanswer unanswered which i think is really commendable. >> rose: what was the hardest part about filming? >> being
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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